3ps-marketing-strategy

The 3 P’s of Marketing Communication

There are three main strategies when it comes to your marketing communication plan, and they are the three Ps; push, pull and profile. From my experience these can be, and arguably should be, used as a blended communication strategy rather than just one – however, this can depend on a number of factors, which are mentioned below. So what’s the difference between a push, pull and profile strategy? Push Strategy A push strategy is a more direct form of communicating with your clients; it’s about ‘pushing’ your products to them with as little advertising as possible. An example of this would be direct selling and exhibitions where a great deal of personal selling is involved. This is a useful strategy for when there’s low brand loyalty, many good substitute products available, or perhaps for impulse buys. Other examples of push strategies include: Direct face to face selling Forging agreements with retailers to stock a product Making supply chain enhancements Promotion through packaging design In store displays Pull Strategy A pull strategy is a softer, but potentially more costly approach, where you encourage customer demand through advertising and promotions, such as free samples, coupons and competitions. This is a good strategy …

Jack of all trades and master of none? You’re lacking focus…

Growing your business and acquiring new clients is difficult, so when an opportunity comes your way you don’t turn it down – do you? Hopefully you spend appropriate time and budget on marketing which generates interest for your business. The question is – is it the right interest? Are you generating leads which take you away from what you’re trying to achieve? Are you trying to satisfy everyone without mastering your market? Are the battles you’re choosing with your competitors the right ones? It’s easy to grasp every opportunity then take stock a year down the line and realise that you’re caught in no man’s land with out direction. OK – so who’s going to turn down an opportunity these days? And, what if that opportunity takes you somewhere that you didn’t realise you wanted to go? The answer is – no one really knows, all we do know is that saying Yes to everything will catch up with you eventually and is unlikely to result in purpose and satisfaction. Who’s got time to stop and consider every move? I don’t. In business you need to think on your feet and make quick decisions about an opening…but choosing the wrong …

STOP! What Have You Missed?

The fact that you’re reading this, in my mind, already makes you a good marketer/business person – not because it’s my article, but because you’re taking the time to see what’s going on in the world. Market share is precious and you need to work hard to gain and hold your ground – the competition won’t think twice about taking customers away from you and vice versa, so you can’t afford to stop! Can you? The problem is, by putting your head down and ‘getting the job done’, opportunities can pass you by and things can be missed…I’m not saying don’t get stuck in – far from it – but working at full pelt, 100% of the time actually limits your potential – I’ve been there and a few hours at the appropriate point to check in with your objectives will make all the difference in the long term. Using your time wisely is the key – it’s the one element which is the same for us all. Are you spending it on the most valuable tasks? Do you REALLY know where you’re going? – even if you do, it’s worth checking in to make sure that it’s still the …

Step 1 To A Successful Brand – Setting A Vision

Your brand’s vision should orientate around the elements which make a brand successful. There are 2 sets of elements which I work to; one by De Pelsmacker et al, who outlined 6 elements, they are; differentiation, added value, good quality, integrated communications, management and employee support and innovation. The other by Simon Middleton of BrandStrategyGuru.com, who highlights 4, they are; be authentic (true to yourself), be compelling (strike an emotional connection), be distinctive (differentiation), be excellent (good quality). As you can see there are some crossovers, but whichever you orientate around, your vision should include the following brand elements: Brand position This links to the differentiation of your brand, what value will it add? Where you see your brand in the market? For example, premium or value? It also addresses who your brand will appeal to, which is the foundation and drives the other areas below. Brand promise What can your stakeholders expect? For example, Coca Cola customers know exactly what to expect every time they open a can of Coke, it’s the same each time. Brand image What’s your desired brand image? For example, cool and stylish or reliable and robust? The answer to this depends on your product …

Marketing Communication Objectives

When setting marketing communication objectives (and all others too) the SMART framework should be used; see our article on Setting SMART Objectives. For marketing communications to be successful, the right message must be communicated at the right time, through the right channels to the right audiences. There are four levels summarised by Fill (2006) which marketing communications must cover: Awareness Customers must be aware of the brand and products, otherwise they won’t know you exist and therefore won’t make a purchase. Comprehension Your audience must understand the brand or product and have sufficient information to be able to make an informed purchasing decision. Conviction Your customers must understand the product benefits and see them as more beneficial than those provided by your competitors. Action As with all communication there should be a desired action, which could be click a link, visit a website, make a phone call. Ultimately the desired action is a sale, even if the first action is to raise awareness. Advertising is a key part of marketing communications and in 1961 Russell Colley developed a framework called DAGMAR, which stands for defining advertising goals for measured advertising results; it was developed to ensure advertising agencies delivered value for …

Setting SMART Objectives

Setting objectives is an important part of any plan; without objectives you will have no direction, measurement for success or ability to focus on areas to improve in the future. It’s well documented that objectives should be SMART: Specific What exactly are you trying to achieve? E.g. Increase market share? Raise brand/product awareness? Measurable How will you measure the objective? E.g. Market share has gone up? Increase is sales? More inbound enquiries? Achievable/Attainable Can you achieve these objectives or are they to ambitious? If they are, perhaps they need to be broken down a little further for the short/medium term, but it’s ok to have more aggressive objectives for a longer period too. Realistic Are they realistic for your brand/organisation? E.g. If you’re a technology start up it’s unrealistic to think you will be competing with Apple after 6 months! Likewise you don’t want to under stretch yourself either. Targeted/Time bound Who is the audience and over what period does the objective need to be achieved? E.g. UK, by close of 2013 SMART Examples The SMART framework can be used to set objectives in the corporate/business plan, marketing plan and down to the brand and communications plan. Here are some …

Writing A Digital Marketing Communications Plan

Marketing communication plans are also referred to as marcomms and are the next level down to your marketing plan; it’s important that they build on the corporate and marketing plan and not duplicate them. Writing a digital marketing communications plan is much like writing an overall digital marketing audit and plan, the difference being that your subject matter is about communicating with your key stakeholders, particularly your customers. There’s a marketing communication plan framework (MCPF) which was developed by Chris Fill, but I tend to use the COSTAC framework which is similar to SOSTAC. COSTAC is broken down as follows: Context Very similar to situation analysis in the SOSTAC framework and helps set the scene. Context should be based on research, the objective here is to set the tone and platform to help position the messages to the key stakeholders. Context could include audience awareness, perception and attitudes; competitor analysis, how it will build on the corporate and marketing plan; STEEPLE factors, organisational values, culture and budgetary considerations. Objectives Set SMART comms objectives around brand/product awareness, customers attitudes and perceptions e.g. raise brand awareness score by 20% by 2015. Strategy Use the 3P communications strategy; Push, Pull and Profile which may include above …

All In One Marketing Audit And Plan

Having just finished the 1st assignment for my CIM Professional Diploma in Marketing, I thought I would put together an all in one Marketing audit and plan, similar to the one we used. This is a great template which gives you a comprehensive platform for building your winning digital marketing strategy! The audit will ensure your current situation is fully understood and the SOSTAC framework is used to outline your plan. SOSTAC is broken down as follows: – Situation – Objectives – Strategy – Tactics – Actions – Control This template is free to download; I hope you find it useful.